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Growing Up

By Brockney C 12 Jan, 2018
Where do we grow other than a garden? The more traditional method is to use a greenhouse. Whilst a greenhouse does offer some protection against inclement weather conditions it can require a lot of heating or cooling depending on the time of year. Unless artificial lighting is used the plants are also dependent on natural sunlight whose strength is not consistent and duration is limited at certain times of the year.

An alternative is to grow the plants indoors. But how do we do this without sufficient sunlight? The answer is to use a grow tent!

The significant advantage of using an indoor grow tent is that the ideal growing temperature can be efficiently maintained and sufficient lighting can be provided at any time of day or night. Whilst air conditions and humidity can also be optimised in a greenhouse the natural outdoor weather conditions dictate the timing of this and also add a degree of unpredictability.

The beauty of using an indoor grow tent is that it alleviates many of the hurdles and obstacles that we naturally have due to different seasonal conditions. This means, that when done correctly, we can effectively grow our crops all year round.

Another huge advantage of grow tents is that anybody can produce crops even if they do not have a garden or allotment! Also, there are no worries about running out of windowlene to clean the windows or retrieving your neighbour's football that just broke one!
By Brockney C 05 Jan, 2018

Eazy Plug Full Cycle: A Revolution in Growing

Only Eazy Plug can offer the unparalleled performance, sustainability and maximized yields all combined into one system: the  Eazy Plug Full Cycle . 

Eazy Plug products are totally organic!

With Eazy Plug Full Cycle it is possible to benefit all advantages of the famous Eazy Plug throughout the entire cultivation period; from propagating up to harvesting.

By Brockney C 04 Jan, 2018
Hydroponic principles have been in practice for thousands of years and were used by the Egyptians, Aztecs and the Babylonians. These regions had dry climates and required an alternative to simply growing near to a river. In Babylon a chain system took water from the Euphrates River which flowed upwards to the landing or garden where it would satisfy the plants. An early record of this is known as the Hanging Gardens of Babylon and goes back to around 600 BC

As time progressed it was recognised that changing the plants' environments can prolong growth. During the Roman Empire the plant beds were moveable so that they could be brought inside during cold or unpleasant weather periods. This is where the idea of greenhouses originated and these were in use as early as the 13th century.

Moving forward to the 18th century, during the American Revolution, 90% of the population there were farmers. This compares to just 3% being farmers in modern times. So a question this raises is how and where are our fruit and vegetables now grown?

Well, the modern system began with scientific experiments that began in (slightly) more modern times. In 1600 it was first noted that plants obtained the substances required for growth via the water that fertilised them. This was groundbreaking research from the Belgian Jan Van Helmont.

In 1699 John Woodward studied this further and established that plants grew the best in water that contained the most soil. This demonstrated that the actual nutrients came from the soil and ware simply delivered by the water.

In the 19th century it was discovered that plants get hydrogen from the water along with carbon and oxygen from the air during a process that is now known as photosynthesis. Two German botanists discovered the formula required for plant growth. Success was achieved when the plants' roots were immersed in a solution of minerals containing calcium (Ca), sulphur (S), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N). This process is now known as 'nutriculture' and the substances required are referred to as 'macroelements' or 'macronutrients' meaning relatively large amounts are required.
By Brockney C 02 Jan, 2018

Christmas may have been and gone, with the steady supply of chocolates starting to dwindle, distant relatives finally packing their bags, and New Year’s Resolutions looming. But fear not, you can start prepping for next Christmas TODAY! Here are some top tips for transplanting your tree, ready for the next festive season!

A few things first:

  • Check your tree is real – not one of those artificial ones…
  • It’s advisable to remove lights, baubles, tinsel, beads, garlands and other festive decorations
  • Check that the tree has roots – cut offs will not grow.

Now that’s out of the way, here’s a little more troubleshooting to note before you start ;)

  • You can transplant your tree at any time – preferably before it becomes a fire hazard.
  • Is your tree still alive…?! We hope you’ve been keeping you tree well-watered and hydrated over the festive period, if not, your tree may unfortunately be a lost cause. If it’s happy and healthy, great! Carry on…
  • Will your species of tree cope with being transplanted? Some species of trees react better to being transplanted as they naturally cope with the drying conditions of indoor environments such as central heating, and therefore will be in a much healthier state ready to be planted. So, if you bought a Nordmann Fir, you’re in luck, as they’re very resilient; however, a Norway Spruce which is already dropping needles, may well be dead.
  • Can all rooted trees be successfully transplanted? Bare root trees will be harder to transplant than trees that have been grown in their container or dug out of the ground with a substantial ball of roots.
  • Your Christmas tree may have some new growth due to the warm and cosy conditions, especially if you were eager to get into the festive spirit and put your tree up early! Trees with new growth can still be transplanted, however the new roots could be damaged by the winter weather so the tree may not perform very well for the first few seasons (unless you’re reading this down under in Aus!)

Ok, so now you’ve double checked your tree is still alive and suitable for transplanting, you’re ready to go!

Top tip: before transplanting into the ground, plant into a PLANT!T 37L Round DirtPot  - this will make it so much easier to take back out of the ground in 2018!

  1. Dig a hole so that the tree will be at the same depth as it is in the pot.
  2. Do not remove any soil from around the roots
  3. Place the tree in the hole and flood the hole with water to ensure the roots are well watered, we recommend using SuperThive  or VitaLink BioPac Powder  to help reduce shock and develop roots
  4. Larger trees may require cane  support. Place this at an angle to the tree so that you do not drive the stake through the root ball and damage any roots.

Ongoing care:


Ensure you water your tree thoroughly in the spring and summer, as the roots will not have had time to establish themselves at a good depth. 

Many thanks to our partners at Hydrogarden for plenty of advance notice!

By Brockney C 02 Jan, 2018

Plants ‘consume’ light, converting the energy through the process of photosynthesis. Light spectrum , duration and intensity are all key components to support photosynthesis. Plants receiving insufficient light levels produce smaller, longer (as compared to wide) leaves and have lower overall weight. Plants receiving excessive amounts of light can dry up, develop extra growing points, become bleached through the destruction of chlorophyll, and display other symptoms of excessive stress. Plants are also damaged by excessive heat (infrared) radiation or extreme ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

Within the acceptable range, however, plants respond very well to light with their growth rate being proportional to irradiance levels. The relative quantum efficiency is a measure of how likely each photon is to stimulate a photosynthetic chemical reaction. The curve of relative quantum efficiency versus wavelength is called the plant photosynthetic response curve as shown earlier in this section.

It is also possible to plot a curve showing the effectiveness of energy in different regions of the spectrum in producing photosynthesis. The fact that blue photons contain more energy than red photons would need to be taken into account, and the resulting curve could be programmed into photometry spheres to directly measure “plant lumens” of light sources instead of “human lumens.” This is likely to happen at some point in the future.

The main ingredient in plants that is responsible for photosynthesis is chlorophyll. Some researchers extracted chlorophyll from plants and studied its response to different wavelengths of light, believing that this response would be identical to the photosynthetic response of plants. However, it is now known that other compounds (carotenoids and phycobilins) also result in photosynthesis. The plant response curve, therefore, is a complex summation of the responses of several pigments and is somewhat different for different plants. An average is generally used which represents most plants, although individual plants may vary by as much as 25% from this curve. While HPS and incandescent lamps are somewhat fixed in their spectral output, metal halide lamps and ceramic metal halide lamps are available in a broad range of spectral outputs. With this in mind, the discriminating grower can choose a lamp that provides the best spectral output for their specific needs.

Thanks to all at Sunmaster Grow Lamps  for the excellent information within the post

By Brockney C 28 Dec, 2017
Simply have two tanks - one for the plants and one for the fish, and connect them both with a pump system for the water.

The water from the fish tank for the plants is nutrient-rich from the fish waste. The water returned to the fish tank is then cleaned by the plants.

The bacteria clears any ammonia and the plants take in the resulting nitrogen.

The plant tank has an auto siphon which drains the water back to the fish.

All that has to be done is to feed the fish and occasionally check the water level in the fish tank.

Easy!
By Brockney C 28 Dec, 2017
Here is a complete guide to using the great gro-tank from Nutriculture  in thirty seconds!

Straighforward advice on feeding, checking the EC, topping up without an EC meter, emptying the tank and testing the pH
By Brockney C 21 Dec, 2017
Scrogging is a growing technique that you can use to force a plant to grow horizontally and this multiplies the light absorbing leaves. This is particularly good for a small grow room! Simply place a net or rack with meshes above your plant and this causes them to grow horizontally through the grid.
By Brockney C 05 Dec, 2017
Check the pH of the water. The pH is a measure of how acidic or alkalinic a liquid is and ranges between 1 and 14 with 1 being the most acidic. Pure water has a pH of 7.0 although is is extremely rare to get pure water out of a tap! In any case most growths thrive best at levels of around 6.0 to 6.5. Checking the pH of a solution is really straightforward with a pH meter such as this one from Essentials

To ensure your water is at the correct level there are addtives such as pH Up  or pH Down  from Vitalink  and many others!
By Brockney C 01 Dec, 2017
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Growing Up

By Brockney C 12 Jan, 2018
Where do we grow other than a garden? The more traditional method is to use a greenhouse. Whilst a greenhouse does offer some protection against inclement weather conditions it can require a lot of heating or cooling depending on the time of year. Unless artificial lighting is used the plants are also dependent on natural sunlight whose strength is not consistent and duration is limited at certain times of the year.

An alternative is to grow the plants indoors. But how do we do this without sufficient sunlight? The answer is to use a grow tent!

The significant advantage of using an indoor grow tent is that the ideal growing temperature can be efficiently maintained and sufficient lighting can be provided at any time of day or night. Whilst air conditions and humidity can also be optimised in a greenhouse the natural outdoor weather conditions dictate the timing of this and also add a degree of unpredictability.

The beauty of using an indoor grow tent is that it alleviates many of the hurdles and obstacles that we naturally have due to different seasonal conditions. This means, that when done correctly, we can effectively grow our crops all year round.

Another huge advantage of grow tents is that anybody can produce crops even if they do not have a garden or allotment! Also, there are no worries about running out of windowlene to clean the windows or retrieving your neighbour's football that just broke one!
By Brockney C 05 Jan, 2018

Eazy Plug Full Cycle: A Revolution in Growing

Only Eazy Plug can offer the unparalleled performance, sustainability and maximized yields all combined into one system: the  Eazy Plug Full Cycle . 

Eazy Plug products are totally organic!

With Eazy Plug Full Cycle it is possible to benefit all advantages of the famous Eazy Plug throughout the entire cultivation period; from propagating up to harvesting.

By Brockney C 04 Jan, 2018
Hydroponic principles have been in practice for thousands of years and were used by the Egyptians, Aztecs and the Babylonians. These regions had dry climates and required an alternative to simply growing near to a river. In Babylon a chain system took water from the Euphrates River which flowed upwards to the landing or garden where it would satisfy the plants. An early record of this is known as the Hanging Gardens of Babylon and goes back to around 600 BC

As time progressed it was recognised that changing the plants' environments can prolong growth. During the Roman Empire the plant beds were moveable so that they could be brought inside during cold or unpleasant weather periods. This is where the idea of greenhouses originated and these were in use as early as the 13th century.

Moving forward to the 18th century, during the American Revolution, 90% of the population there were farmers. This compares to just 3% being farmers in modern times. So a question this raises is how and where are our fruit and vegetables now grown?

Well, the modern system began with scientific experiments that began in (slightly) more modern times. In 1600 it was first noted that plants obtained the substances required for growth via the water that fertilised them. This was groundbreaking research from the Belgian Jan Van Helmont.

In 1699 John Woodward studied this further and established that plants grew the best in water that contained the most soil. This demonstrated that the actual nutrients came from the soil and ware simply delivered by the water.

In the 19th century it was discovered that plants get hydrogen from the water along with carbon and oxygen from the air during a process that is now known as photosynthesis. Two German botanists discovered the formula required for plant growth. Success was achieved when the plants' roots were immersed in a solution of minerals containing calcium (Ca), sulphur (S), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N). This process is now known as 'nutriculture' and the substances required are referred to as 'macroelements' or 'macronutrients' meaning relatively large amounts are required.
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